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Cambridge AHRC Doctoral Training Partnership

 

Doing Research in the Digital Age

Cambridge Digital Humanities is working the DTP to provide training to support the needs of researchers in the digital age - this includes accessible introductions to key digital methods, techniques in networked scholarly practice, advice and training on using digital tools. We also organise an extensive programme of advanced workshops featuring problems and challenges in digital methods and opportunities for interdisciplinary networking.

2017-18 Events

The method programme includes themes, such as 'Machine Reading the Archive' or 'Doing Research in the Digital Age'.

For more information on the programme and online booking, please follow the below links:

Introductory sessions

Advanced workshops in Digital Methods

 


 

2016 Events

Monday 22 February. 10.30am to 4.30pm. Queen Mary University of London, Mile End Campus - Law Building, Room G5.
Citizen Journalism Workshop Series for Graduate Students and Researchers

International State Crime Initiative, Queen Mary University of London and Social Media Knowledge Exchange, University of Cambridge

Workshop 1: 22 February, QMUL, London

Exposing State Crime Through Citizen Media and Digitized Resistance

Case Studies from Egypt and Burma

Armed with mobile phones and digital cameras, civil society activists are engaging in innovative forms of citizen journalism to challenge entrenched state power structures. The production, publication and circulation of user-generated content documenting human rights abuses is not only creating ‘discourses of resistance’ but also exposing state crime. This workshop will examine methods of digitized resistance in two of the most repressive regimes: Egypt and Burma. Moreover, it will examine how civic engagement is sharpening public accountability as well as the democratization of knowledge through a blend of citizen journalism and digital activism. As Meier asserts, “the future of political activism in repressive environments belongs to those who mix and master both digital activism and civil resistance – digital resistance”(Meier, 2008).

Practical workshop component: Through the sourcing of online information and hands-on engagement with data relating to Egypt and Burma, workshop participants will be able to better understand “crowd-powered” evidence gathering practices as well as some of the challenges confronting citizen journalists. More importantly, the production of digital content by workshop participants in the form of ‘social media outputs’ can lead to interesting insights into how citizen journalists use data-driven information as a technological weapon of resistance.

Speakers:

•    Dr Anne Alexander  (Cambridge)

•    Saeb Kasm (International State Crime Initiative, QMUL)

•    Dr Thomas MacManus  (International State Crime Initiative, QMUL)

•    Kyaw Win  (Director, Burma Human Rights Network)

Event details:

Monday 22 February 10:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Mile End Campus – Law Building, Room G5

Organised by the International State Crime Initiative (QMUL) and the Social Media Knowledge Exchange (Cambridge)

Please book a place in advance on Eventbrite (here).

 

Monday 7 March. 11.30am to 3.30pm. University of Cambridge - Faculty of English, GR05.
Citizen Journalism Workshop Series for Graduate Students and Researchers

International State Crime Initiative, Queen Mary University of London and Social Media Knowledge Exchange, University of Cambridge

Workshop 2: 7 March, Cambridge

Citizen journalism and narratives of power in the Arab revolutions

This workshop for graduate students and researchers will examine the role of citizen journalists in both disrupting and reinforcing narratives articulated by those in power during the 2011 uprisings and their aftermath. Taking Egypt and Syria as case studies, we will examine whether access to social media affected whose narratives became ‘mainstream’. We will investigate the shifting boundaries of the ‘unthinkable’ and the ‘unsayable’ in the midst of social and political upheaval on a scale not seen in the region for decades, and the impact of social media on ways in which particular narratives about gender, class and religion became more or less influential during the cycle of revolution and counter-revolution.

The workshop will also include a practical element, where participants will have the opportunity to work in small groups to research and present plans for online content or a social media campaign challenging the narratives which emerged as particularly influential at key moments in the revolutionary process.

Speakers:

•    Saeb Kasm (International State Crime Initiative, QMUL)

•    Dr Ali Ali (LSE)

•    Dr Sameh Naguib (SOAS, Egypt’s Contentious Media project)

Organised by the Social Media Knowledge Exchange, International State Crime Initiative and the Egypt’s Contentious Media project with support from the Cambridge AHRC Doctoral Training Partnership.

Please book a place in advance on Eventbrite (here).